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Friday, October 7, 2016

Respiratory oscillations in EPI and SMS-EPI

tl;dr   When using SMS there is a tendency to acquire smaller voxels as well as use shorter TR. There are three mechanisms contributing to the visibility of respiratory motion with SMS-EPI compared to conventional EPI. Firstly, smaller voxels exhibit higher apparent motion sensitivity than larger voxels. What was intra-voxel motion becomes inter-voxel motion, and you see/detect it. Secondly, higher in-plane resolution means greater distortion via the extended EPI readout echo train, and therefore greater sensitivity to changes in B0. Finally, shorter TR tends to enhance the fine structure in motion parameters, often revealing oscillations that were smoothed at longer TR. Hence, it's not the SMS method itself but the voxel dimensions, in-plane EPI parameters and TR that are driving the apparent sensitivity to respiration. Similar respiration sensitivity is obtained with conventional single-shot EPI as for SMS-EPI when spatial and temporal parameters are matched.


The effects of chest motion on the main magnetic field, B0, are well-known. Even so, I was somewhat surprised when I began receiving reports of likely respiratory oscillations in simultaneous multi-slice (SMS) EPI data acquired across a number of projects, centers and scanner manufacturers. (See Note 1.) Was it simply a case of a new method getting extra attention, revealing an issue that had been present but largely overlooked in regular EPI scans? Or was the SMS scheme exhibiting a new, or exacerbated, problem?

Upper section of Fig. 4 from Power,, showing the relationship between apparent head motion (red trace) reported from a realignment algorithm and chest motion (blue trace) recorded by a respiratory belt. See the paper for an explanation of the bottom B&W panel.